John Kistler of Minneapolis Discusses the Long History Behind his Hometown


MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA, USA, October 15, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ —
The twin cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis are the most populated in the state of Minnesota and have a rich history that reaches centuries into the past. Residents like John Kistler work to preserve the original charm and historical aspects of their hometowns, and he shares insight into how Minneapolis came to be what it is today.

John Kistler of Minnesota has long chronicled the colorful past and the events that secured Minneapolis’ place in American geography, history, and industry. Hundreds of years old, the city has passed into the ownership of numerous people and spans time before America was ever a country.

“Minneapolis is so much more than half of the Twin Cities,” says John Kistler of Minnesota. “It has a rich history that begins when the area was claimed by the French nearly a hundred years before the American revolution, making it one of the oldest cities in the country.”

The city of Minneapolis is built on both sides of the Mississippi River just west of St. Paul and only a few miles from the Canadian border. The area that eventually became half of the twin cities remained wild until the first stirrings of civilization took hold in the late 17th century. It was then that French explorers first discovered the land, most notably a priest who’d accompanied sailors on their journey to the New World.

Here, the priest stumbled on the Mississippi River’s only waterfall and named it Saint Anthony Falls after his patron saint. Later, Spanish troops laid claim to the area before it went back to the French and then over to the revolutionaries during their struggle. It was only officially negotiated into a final sale to the Americans in the Louisiana Purchase, which came from Napoleon Bonaparte.

“Even after the American purchased the land, it remained largely undeveloped until Fort Snelling was built in the early 1800s,” says John Kistler of Minnesota.

Fort Snelling extended the United States’ jurisdiction over the area and helped to ease concerns over British troops attempting to reclaim the area. Large groups of American troops were shipped into Fort Snelling who used local resources to create food and supplies. They looked to the surrounding land for means to create roads, vegetable gardens, wheat and hay fields, and grazing fields where they raised cattle. Three years after the Fort was constructed, the men of the area built a lumber mill and a grist mill on the river’s falls to keep the fort consistently stocked with supplies.

“As the soldiers cultivated the land for Fort Snelling, they truly began civilized life in the area, which would later become the Minneapolis and St. Paul districts,” says John Kistler.

A few decades after Fort Snelling was built, President Millard Fillmore opened the area up to more settlers who began bringing culture and diversity to the area. The settlers kept coming and bestowed the name Minneapolis on the developed land, or the “city of Waters.” Families from across the country and around the world have thrived in Minneapolis ever since and have made it home to some of the nation’s most distinguished businesses and institutions.

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7862338220
email us here


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One-of-a-kind, handmade textiles spanning 250 years of Japanese history will be auctioned by Bruneau & Co., October 26th


Circa 1890 Meiji Period hand-painted Furisode kimono, decorated with yuzen dye flowers rendered with multiple tones and depth accentuated by embroidery (est. $2,000-$3,000).

Edo Period embroidered Uchikake kimono, circa 1840, hand-woven pale gray silk with gold thread cranes, gold couching and pale pink cherry blossoms (est. $1,500-$2,500).

Edo Period embroidered Uchikake kimono, circa 1840, hand-woven red silk crepe with finely rendered cranes and foliage, gold thread accents, couching (est. $1,500-$2,500).

Edo Period circa 1800 purple silk brocade Kesa textile, hand-woven with rich gold thread flowers throughout, measuring 44 inches by 44 inches (est. $1,500-$2,500).

It’s part of the single-owner collection of Alexander Murray. Also sold will be over 250 Japanese scroll paintings, plus bronze and iron antique Buddha figures.

Asian arts have always been a specialty of mine, and this sale hits me right in the sweet spot. Plus, Alex is a great guy to work with and we couldn’t be prouder to represent the collection.”

— Kevin Bruneau

CRANSTON, RI, UNITED STATES, October 9, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Part of the astounding single-owner collection of Alexander Murray of New York City, including more than 50 pieces of one-of-a-kind, hand-made textiles spanning 250 years of Japanese history, will come up for bid at an auction scheduled for Saturday, October 26th, by Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers, online and in the Cranston gallery at 63 Fourth Avenue.

The Murray collection at one time featured more than 1,000 pieces, including kimono, obi, theatrical costumes and kesa from the Edo, Meiji, Taisho and Showa periods. The offerings in the Bruneau catalog represent 52 exquisite examples. Also offered will be over 250 Japanese scroll paintings and over 20 bronze and iron antique Buddha figures.

The Katonah Museum of Art in Katonah, New York featured these very kimonos as part of its Lethal Beauty Exhibit of Samurai Weapons and Armor from October 12th through January 4th, 2015. The Nippon Gallery in New York City exhibited the offered collection of kimonos as part of its Essence of Kimono exhibition in July and August of 2013.

The textiles collection is unmatched in its breadth and diversity, representing every type of weaving, dyeing and decorative technique in silk, cotton, hemp, ramie and wool.

“Asian arts have always been a specialty of mine, and this sale hits me right in the sweet spot,” said Kevin Bruneau, president of Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers. “Plus, Alex is a great guy to work with and we couldn’t be prouder to represent the collection. High fashion has come to Bruneau.”

Travis Landry, a Bruneau & Co. auctioneer and specialist, added, “Auctioneering this sale is certainly going to hold some surprises, especially when it comes to the scrolls. I’m very curious to see what pops and what doesn’t. I’m sure out of 253 scrolls there are bound to be some gems.” Mr. Landry added that the original paintings have pre-sale estimates ranging from $50-$10,000.

Kimonos promise to be a major attraction. A circa 1890 Meiji Period hand-painted Furisode kimono, lined with a striking brocade and boasting a 49 ½ inch wingspan, is estimated to bring $2,000-$3,000. The hand-woven light blue silk crepe five crested kimono is decorated with yuzen dye flowers rendered with multiple tones and depth accentuated by embroidery.

Several pieces date to Japan’s Edo Period (1603-1868) and include these fine offerings:

• Embroidered gold crane Uchikake kimono, circa 1840, hand-woven pale gray silk with hand embroidery of gold thread cranes, gold couching and pale pink cherry blossoms; 49 inch wingspan, 23 inch body, 63 inch length (est. $1,500-$2,500)

• Embroidered cranes Uchikake kimono, circa 1840, hand-woven red silk crepe with beautifully rendered hand-embroidered cranes and foliage, gold thread accents and couching. 49 ¼ inch wingspan, 24inch body, 62 inch length (est. $1,500-$2,500).

• Circa 1800 purple silk brocade Kesa textile, hand-woven with rich gold thread flowers throughout, measuring 44 inches by 44 inches (est. $1,500-$2,500).

Online bidding will be offered by LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com, Bidsquare.com and bidLIVE.Bruneauandco.com, plus the mobile app “Bruneau & Co.” on iTunes or GooglePlay. Previews will be held Thursday and Friday, October 24th and 25th, from 9 am-5 pm Eastern time, and on auction day at 9 am. The auction will begin at 11 am with no pre-sale auction beforehand.

After this auction, Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers has two major events lined up for the balance of 2019, also online and in the Cranston gallery. They include an Estate Antiques & Fine Art Auction on Saturday, November 16th and a Comics & Toys Auction on Saturday, December 14th.

Bruneau & Co. is currently accepting quality consignments for that and all future auctions, with commissions as low as zero percent. Now would be a good time to clean out your attic. To contact Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers about consigning a single piece or an entire collection, you may send an e-mail to info@bruneauandco.com. Or, you can phone them at (401) 533-9980.

To learn more about Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers and the Saturday, October 26th auction, please visit www.bruneauandco.com. Updates are posted frequently.

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Travis Landry
Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers
+1 401-533-9980
email us here


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